Prosperous Coach (Again)

I’m going through the Prosperous Coach again. Now that I’m finally able to build this coaching practice, there’s a ton coming to the surface that is valuable to me. Steve Chandler and Rich Litvin are so wonderfully committed and challenging. I’m sharing here just to share; thinking out loud with my fingers. If you find any order in the following, I don’t know how it got there.

From Chapter 8: Loving the “hard” part

The second paragraph catches my eye. Rich’s model doesn’t quite fit for me:

From “The Prosperous Coach” by Steve Chandler and Rich Litvin

This one is closer:

From “The Prosperous Coach” by Steve Chandler and Rich Litvin

Here’s where my model is at the moment:

Rich’s second diagram certainly allows for this. Contrarianism-R’nt-Us. For me, it’s more about discovering a client. That discovery process doesn’t stop when some kind of coaching agreement is in place any more than it ends when we don’t interact as often. I’m interested in those around me because I’m interested in those around me. My discovering them is my discovering me. That we arrange ourselves in such a way to work more closely together is only a phase change in the process of human beings discovering one another and themselves. In other words, a declared relationship allows us to attend to that process more deliberately — and it is a modification instead of a metamorphosis. The miracles simply show up more quickly.

From Chapter 10: Cultivate deep foundations

To become highly successful as a coach, you need to master three disciplines Rich Litvin

For me, the three disciplines are not separate and, in some important ways, not distinct. They are overlapping facets of the same gem; they exist together or not at all.

To be more specific, creating clients is about helping someone discover currently unavailable resources. That’s the definition of coaching. An inability to connect with that which will help them take the next step is what’s in the way. “Creating Clients” is coaching. It’s a search for a human being — which, by the way, is the definition of deep inner work. I am searching for me as I am searching for them. All fear and excitement that rises in me is the fear and excitement rising within them. Them finding me is them finding themselves. Me finding them is me finding myself.

Just a word or two on “mastery” from Rich’s quote. For me, mastery is a journey. I’m building a coaching practice; I have no interest in a coaching factory.

From Chapter 43

But I promised myself that I was never going back to work in an organization. I was never again going to have a boss. Rich Litvin

For me, I’d be beyond happy to work in an organization which supported a boss who was seeing to my growth and well-being and the growth and well-being of my family.

Done For Now (5-Mar-2018 9:35am)

Not sure when I’ll be back to work through the rest of the book. I think you can subscribe to this post if you’re interested.

Orlando, Florida, United States of America

Getting Paid as a Coach

I don’t care about money. It’s the system we created to take care of each other if we have a mind to. It’s the give and take of care that’s interesting to me. As I coach and as I’m coached, I give and receive value; part of that value is given and received as money. It’s just the current system. What’s the big deal? Either we care for each other or we don’t. At base, money has nothing to do with it. Chip Nowacek

Rebuttal of “5 People Who Shouldn’t Be Your Weight-Loss Coach”

The July 28th, 2016 Women’s Health article by Alexandria Gomez needs a different title:

If a Registered Dietician Isn’t Your Guru, You’re Messing Up.

Ms. Gomez would you have you believe the R.D.s have it all figured out. If that were so, why is such an article necessary? That’s not so say R.D.s can’t be helpful; they can — and weight ain’t all about what you eat. Sorry. Ask an R.D. to address why you eat what you eat. Just ask.

Let’s try this another way: do people who smoke know smoking is bad for their health? Do you eat stuff you know is contrary to your well-being?